individual

the individual disrupts silos

Does your organization suffer from the impacts of working in silos? You know the barriers that develop between the functional departments of an organization? As an individual professional you can experience poor communication, conflicting directions, redundancy, and less than optimal decision making. Though much of the silo barriers can develop in the systems and data, what I’m concerned about is the human element. I want to focus on you.

the individual disrupts silos

It’s your responsibility. That’s right. Each individual in the organizations that does nothing to break down the silos is contributing to and reinforcing their existence. That means I don’t want to hear you whine and complain about the silos if you are not willing to do something about it.

there’s more……

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don’t label me

I don’t care what people call me, labels have the negative value of making smaller boundaries for people.
~Michael Graves

Just yesterday I was researching a topic for a client and the search led me to a personality test. I decided to take it since it had been years for this particular assessment. To my amazement the test results were very different,  and so I took it again, making sure I answered the questions as honestly as possible.  Surprise again, the results were consistent the second time. I began to read the description of the ‘type’ and as I read, I could feel my face start to scrunch up, nose crinkled, eyebrows crooked, like I had eaten a sour grape. This description is nothing like me! Ok. Maybe one or two of the statements is accurate, some of the time. But, really? Then I started to question: how in the world can a 48 question test know me? How in the world can they (whomever they are) judge me? Label me? Tell me who I am or what I do? They can’t. Read more to discover what you can do with labels…

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How to deal with the disruptive participant

Once upon a time….That’s how a story begins, right? I have one I want to share with you. I’ve changed the names, but the situation is all to familiar. See if you can find yourself in this story.

Jill walks into the hotel conference room a little early. She wants to make sure she picks a good seat where she can see, hear, and interact with the presenters. The round tables are strategically placed three rows of three to allow for comfortable walking and viewing, 9 tables in all. Jill selects the front left table directly in front of the flip chart. She sits down to test her view. From her inside seat she can see everything perfectly. The other participants begin to make their way into the conference area, picking up their coffee and selecting their seats.

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